Content calendar

A Social Media Checklist for Businesses

There’s a right way for businesses to use social media and there’s a wrong way. The right way actively engages with customers and users. It involves creating and sharing engaging content. The wrong way uses a purely promotional angle. It creates posts full of random hashtags and doesn’t respond to or interact with others.

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Using a checklist to monitor your company’s daily, weekly or monthly social media tasks will help you use social media in the right way. A checklist will also help you make adjustments or change course as needed.

The checklist should include the following:

  •  Respond to Comments and Messages (Daily)

One of the most important things you can do on social media is respond to comments and messages from your followers, fans or customers. When people reach out to a company over social media, they expect a response, fast.

A survey conducted by Convince and Convert found that 32% of respondents expected a business to respond to their message on social media within half an hour. Forty two percent expected a response within an hour. Customers want a quick reply anytime, whether it is the weekend or midnight on a weekday.

Responding to any messages should be a daily social media activity. In fact, you should have someone constantly monitoring your social media profiles for messages or mentions, so that you can reply quickly. Additionally, it helps to do a search every day for your business’ name on social media. People occasionally post about companies without using hashtags or usernames. It can be easy to miss those quiet mentions, but if you catch them, you’ll win your way into the hearts of customers.

  •  Find and Follow Others (Daily)

Along with replying to anyone who reaches out to you, it’s worth it to find new people to connect with through social media on a daily basis. You can search for leaders in your industry to follow or you can reach out to people who look as though they’d be interested in what you have to offer.

To do that, search for phrases or keywords that are relevant to your business on your various platforms. When you find a conversation or post about a topic that’s relevant to your company, find a way to jump in and add your input or some advice.

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One thing not to do when you’re looking to connect with others on social: follow then unfollow once that user has followed you back. If you’re going to follow a lot of people, commit to following them. It’s just bad manners to unfollow once you’ve gotten the follow back, even though it happens frequently.

  •  Create and Stick to a Social Media Content Calendar (Weekly)

You can’t post anything or share anything on social media if you don’t have an idea or plan for what to post. Creating a weekly social media content calendar gives you an idea what you need to post and when. It also helps you see how much you need to post on each site you use.

While maintaining and updating your content calendar should be a weekly (or even monthly) task, actually posting the content should happen daily. You’ll want to post at least once a day on most social accounts, but at least six times a day on Twitter, where people tend to be much more prolific.

  •  Pay Attention to What Your Competition Is Doing (Weekly)

It helps to keep an eye on what your competitors are doing on social media and on how they are using their social accounts. You don’t want to copy what other companies are doing, but you do want to check in from time to time.

Doing so lets you see what those competitors aren’t doing, so that you can fill in the gaps with your own social accounts. You can also see what’s working for them and what’s not and use that information to shape your company’s own social strategy.

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  •  Check Your Data (Monthly)

Every month, check out how your business’ various social profiles are performing. Analytics available from each social network make this pretty easy to do. For example, Twitter will tell you how each of your posts performed, how many people engaged with each post and how many people it post reached. Facebook does something similar. You can also see how many new people liked or followed your page each month and whether you’re social presence is growing or shrinking.

  •  Make Adjustments as Needed (Monthly)

The social media landscape is always changing. As social networks update or change their policies, your company will need to adjust its tactics. Keep up with the policies for each network you use and adjust your plan as needed.

You might also want to set monthly social media goals. For example, you might aim to get 100 new Twitter followers a month. If you reach that goal, increase it. If not, take a look at what you are doing and figure out what’s not helping you or what’s standing in the way of you reaching your goal.

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5 ways to keep content current

Although staying up-to-date with your company’s content and website can seem like just one more thing you have to worry about in the age of digital media, it’s increasingly important. If you’ve ever visited a website that looked as if it was last updated in 2005 and wondered if the company was still in business, you’ve seen first hand what can happen if you don’t keep content fresh.

Your customers not only want to know what it going on with your company, they also want proof that your business is a leader and influencer in its field. Having a website and social media profiles that reflect that will convince customers that your company is the one to work with. Here are a few relatively simple ways to keep your content up-to-the-minute.

Create an Editorial Calendar

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 It’s difficult to stick to a schedule for posting on your blogs or for posting on social media if you don’t have a clear outline of what to post and when. When it comes to your blog, you don’t have to have a new post up daily (unless you’re very prolific or have a large team of blog writers), but you should aim to get a post on a consistent basis, such as every Monday at 8 am or every other Wednesday at noon.

Putting together an editorial calendar helps you come up with fresh and relevant topics for your blog, too. For example, if you’re planning the content schedule for early summer and you work with a company that provides services to educators, you can come up with post topics that are relevant to things a teacher might need to do over the summer, such as put together next year’s syllabus.

Get Busy on Social Media

Just as you want to create and stick to a consistent schedule with your company’s blog, you want to create and stick to a schedule for social media posting. There is a sweet spot when it comes to how much to post. If you don’t post that much, customers will forget you exist. If you post too much, there’s the chance they will get annoyed and block or unfollow you.

Buffer, a social media scheduling service, took a close look at user engagement on a variety of social media networks to determine when people’s interest dropped off. It found that after two posts a day on Facebook, people were less likely to comment or “like” a post. In the case of Pinterest, brands who posted five times a day or more had the most success. People seem less excited about frequent posts on LinkedIn, and Buffer recommended just a single post each weekday on that site.

Update Your About Page (and the Rest of Your Site)

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Your company has evolved over time. Your website and social media profiles should reflect that change. Take a look at your business’ About page, as it might be due for an update.

Add any new information to the About section, such as the name of any new employees, a new location if you’ve moved, or a new division if you’ve recently expanded. It might be that the information on the About page is accurate, but the page itself isn’t engaging.

If someone wrote the page in a hurry when you put the website up initially, it might not be the best reflection of who your company is or how it serves customers. Take some time to edit the page and make it an accurate introduction to your business.

You should keep the rest of your website current, too. If you have white papers or case studies on your site, take a look at them every year or so and replace them with updated versions. You don’t want potential customers reading outdated white papers to get information or looking at case studies that don’t reflect your business’ capabilities in the here and now.

Revisit Old Blog Posts

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Just as you revise and update static website pages and content, it’s worth it to revise old, but still relevant, blog posts from time to time. You might not need to edit the content of the posts so much as you need to adjust them to make them more shareable on social media or to boost their SEO. If you’d like to start using Pinterest, for example, you might go back to old posts and add eye catching images to them, so that pinners want to click on your post.

Some posts might just need a bit of clean up. They might contain broken links or you might have missed some spelling or grammatical errors the first time around. You might have written more on the topic since your first post and wish to include the link to your follow-up in the original.

Try New Formats

Another way to freshen up your content is to switch up the format. If you’re not getting much traction with 1,000-word blog posts, perhaps a video will appeal to your visitors more. If you need to share a lot of facts and figures, it might be worth it to put together an infographic.

Creating content in a variety of formats can also increase your social media reach. People look for images on Pinterest, for example, but tend to want something in-depth on LinkedIn. While you shouldn’t try to please all of the people, having plenty of options will help increase your company’s reach.

When it comes to communicating with your clients, you don’t want to fall off the grid. Keeping your website up-to-date, boosting or maintaining your social presence, and keeping your blog current will all help you keep your content fresh.